THE INTERN

Using an incredibly hokey premise and coming off like an over manufactured product, The Intern is a kind and gentle movie that massages the shoulders of the generation on the way out while holding the door open for the generation on the way in. Too bad that it fails to really say anything in the meantime, choosing instead to plays directly to the middle, refraining from saying anything offensive or insightful. The premise is bland; Ben (Robert De Niro) is a 70-year-old widower and retired vice president of a phone book printing company. With little to keep him active, he … Continue reading THE INTERN

THE NEW GIRLFRIEND

It is safe to say that any director worth their weight will eventually be compared to the cinematic yardstick that is Alfred Hitchcock. While all who make movies owe something to the Master of Suspense, the actual inheritor to his throne has yet to be decided. But if anyone deserves it, it is the French master of sex and psychology, François Ozon. For the past twenty years, Ozon has explored the tropes that Hitchcock made famous and would have had a field day with had the Production Code not encumber him, and Ozon’s latest, The New Girlfriend (Une nouvelle amie), … Continue reading THE NEW GIRLFRIEND

CLUB SANDWICH

Héctor (Lucio Giménez Cacho) and his mother, Paloma (María Renée Prudencio), have come to a quite Mexican resort for a vacation. He is sixteen, she is in her thirties and the father is nowhere in sight. Judging by their closeness, he never was. It has been said that the average man thinks about sex at least three times a minute. For Héctor, and most 16-year-olds, that number is zero. Unfortunately, the only female contact Héctor has is his mother and when she isn’t around, he puts on her deodorant, dons her red bikini and masturbates in bed. Paloma isn’t much … Continue reading CLUB SANDWICH

STEVE JOBS: THE MAN IN THE MACHINE

“It wasn’t for you, it was you,” Sherry Turkle, author and MIT professor, says describing Apple Computer products. It’s a good line — succinct, accurate, catchy — and it catches director Alex Gibney’s ear, later recycling it in one of his many voiceovers. It’s how Gibney chooses to see Steve Jobs, a genius inventor that didn’t work for you, but was/is you. Why else would people across the globe feel such a personal connection to a multi-millionaire phone designer? This is the central question of Gibney’s latest documentary, Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine, a cradle-to-grave story of Apple … Continue reading STEVE JOBS: THE MAN IN THE MACHINE