THE ONLY LIVING BOY IN NEW YORK

As far as the filmmakers behind The Only Living Boy in New York want you to think, Thomas Webb (Callum Turner) is your typical New Yorker. He feels he was born a few decades too late — he would have preferred the gritty, hard-scrabble NYC of the 1970s — is in love with a girl who just wants to be friends (Kiersey Clemons), lives in a Lower East Side walk-up so he doesn’t have the displeasure of running into his Upper West Side parents (Pierce Brosnan and Cynthia Nixon), befriends an hard-drinking novelist (Jeff Bridges) and works at a rare … Continue reading THE ONLY LIVING BOY IN NEW YORK

LOUDER THAN BOMBS

If there is a truth in life, it is a simple one: everybody is trying their best. It’s an often-difficult truth to accept because it is far too easy to criticize one another for their shortcomings, their mistakes, their screw-ups. Even though people in glasshouses shouldn’t throw stones, they commonly do. And, so, we soldier forth trying to make it through this world as best we can, trying desperately to understand one another. Joachim Trier’s third film, Louder Than Bombs, is about that desperate search for the truth, both within and without. Three years ago, renowned war photojournalist Isabelle (Isabelle … Continue reading LOUDER THAN BOMBS

LOW DOWN

Sometimes, things just line up. In the past two weeks, I have watched three movies dealing with jazz music and musicians, and all three have found different, if not cliché approaches to explore the artistic expression of the genre. First was Damien Chazelle’s Whiplash, a grueling ordeal about a student/mentor relationship and the relentless pursuit of perfection. Following that was Keep On Keepin’ On, a documentary from Alan Hicks about Terry Clark and his protégé, Justin Kauflin. In direct contrast to Whiplash, Terry was not only one of the most prolific jazz trumpeters he was also the happiest. A narrative … Continue reading LOW DOWN